Rigid Rail Gallows

Rigid Gallow Fall Protection Systems

Trolley style rigid rail gallows fall protection systems are typically utilized for outdoor applications where total fall clearance is minimal.  Trolley style gallows systems minimize fall distance and deflection, and require smaller foundations.  Rigid rail gallows systems also easily accommodate multiple users, making them ideal for many outdoor fall protection applications. Available in both permanent and portable configurations, Rigid gallows trolley systems are common solutions for truck, train, and heavy equipment maintenance, as well as loading and tarping applications.

A L Gallow system provides safe access to railcars
Rigid Rail Gallows
A L Gallow system provides safe access to railcars
Rigid Rail Gallows
A L Gallow system provides safe access to railcars
Rigid Rail Gallows
A L Gallow system provides safe access to railcars
Rigid Rail Gallows

Each system we install is the product of an on-site engineering visit where our safety experts watch the interaction of your equipment and personnel to create a custom solution. Our turnkey approach means you can rely on one company to engineer, fabricate, install, and re-certify a custom fall protection solution that provides years of safe and reliable service.

Remember, falls are the leading cause of occupational injuries and fatalities each year.  From a business standpoint, the increased insurance and workman’s compensation premiums combined with the legal fees associated with a fall can have dire consequences.  Ensure OSHA compliance and worker safety with a rigid gallows system from the safety experts at Diversified Fall Protection.

We are a complete turnkey provider of OSHA compliant rigid rail fall protection systems and have years of experience designing and installing gallows systems for fall arrest applications. Contact us for expert assistance with your fall arrest, fall restraint and fall protection requirements

 

 

Design Considerations

Rigid Gallows Design Considerations
One of the first design considerations that needs to be examined when developing a rigid gallows system is size of the planned coverage area, or more simply put, the total length of the system.  With proper planning and consideration, Rigid Gallows Systems can span work areas in excess of 1,000 feet.  For rigid gallows systems designed for rail applications, specific railroad company clearances must also be taken into consideration.  Gallows systems come in a variety of configurations, including L, T, and U.  A T gallows system provides dual coverage for two trucks or side by side rail spurs.  When designing a rigid gallows system, soil compaction levels and frost line levels must be given special consideration to ensure proper foundation design.  Finally, care must be taken to consider total fall clearance; the system must be able to arrest a fall before a worker comes into contact with structure or the ground below the designated work area.

OSHA Regulations

  • Personal Fall Arrest Systems
    • 1926.502(d)
      'Personal fall arrest systems.' Personal fall arrest systems and their use shall comply with the provisions set forth below. Effective January 1, 1998, body belts are not acceptable as part of a personal fall arrest system. Note: The use of a body belt in a positioning device system is acceptable and is regulated under paragraph (e) of this section.
    • 1926.502(d)(16)
      Personal fall arrest systems, when stopping a fall, shall:
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(i)
      limit maximum arresting force on an employee to 900 pounds (4 kN) when used with a body belt;
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(ii)
      limit maximum arresting force on an employee to 1,800 pounds (8 kN) when used with a body harness;
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(iii)
      be rigged such that an employee can neither free fall more than 6 feet (1.8 m), nor contact any lower level;
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(iv)
      bring an employee to a complete stop and limit maximum deceleration distance an employee travels to 3.5 feet (1.07 m); and,
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(v)
      have sufficient strength to withstand twice the potential impact energy of an employee free falling a distance of 6 feet (1.8 m), or the free fall distance permitted by the system, whichever is less.

Did You Know?

That any fall protection system must be engineered for two times the applied load in the event of a fall?