Tech Talk Blog

Railcar Fall Protection

Fall protection for railcar loading and unloading applications is more complicated than meets the eye.  You won’t see workers toiling away at impressive heights since most railcars are around 15 feet high.  And to the untrained eye, rail yards and rail sidings appear less crowded than the manufacturing areas inside industrial facilities.   That said, fall protection is an absolute necessity for personnel accessing the top surfaces of railcars and tankers.

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Roof Fall Protection For Data Centers

Today’s digital economy is driven by data centers, and in many areas of the country with large pockets of data center activity, new facilities aren’t going online fast enough to keep up with demand. The data center boom has made the transfer of information more efficient, but it is also exposing maintenance personnel and contractors to new fall hazards that require a creative approach to remediation.  Here’s why….

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OSHA Requirements for Guardrail and Safety Railing Compliance

osha logoOne of the more popular fall protection questions we receive relates to OSHA requirements for safety railing and guardrail systems.  Determined inquiring minds can consult OSHA’s revised Walking Working Surfaces ruling for general industry, but this can be a laborious process.  In the interest of time, here is OSHA’s official stance on guardrail for general industry applications….

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OSHA’s Revised Walking Working Surfaces Implementation Timeline

OSHA’s recent updates to its General Industry Walking-Working Surfaces and Fall Protection Standards will impact 112 million workers at 7 million workplaces.  According to OSHA estimates, the new Slips, Trips, and Falls regulations will prevent 29 fatalities and 5,842 lost-workday injuries every year.  If you are wondering about the timeline for implementing the new standards, we have a new post that may help…..

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Planning For After The Fall: Why Rescue Plans Are Important

When folks begin learning about fall safety, they gravitate toward the fall protection systems, best practices, and PPE designed to prevent or arrest falls.  All of this is a good start—but learning about the dangers present after a fall is arrested is of equal or greater importance.

When a tied-off worker slips and plunges toward ground level, a properly designed and installed fall arrest system deploys and absorbs the forces associated with the fall, preventing contact with structure below—and/or ground level.  In this case, the worker is suspended somewhere between the work surface and ground level.  The fall arrest system has done its job, and yet, without a prompt rescue, the same system that arrests a fall can threaten an employee’s life.

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OSHA’s Updated Walking-Working Surfaces Ruling

osha logoOn November 18, 2016 the Occupational Safety and Health Administration issued its final ruling on Walking-Working Surfaces (29 CFR Part 1910, Subpart D) and the general industry Personal Protective Equipment Standards (29 CFR Part 1910, Subpart I). The revised ruling occupies 513 pages in the Federal Record and the new requirements will impact 112.3 million employees at 6.9 million general industry establishments. With many of the provisions of the final ruling scheduled to become effective early next year, many safety professionals are left wondering about the steps their companies need to take to ensure compliance.

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Did You Know?

In 2015, Fall Protection was ranked number one as the most frequently cited OSHA standards violation?