Tech Talk Blog

Rooftop Guardrail vs. Horizontal Lifelines–What’s The Best Option?

Last month, we did a post titled “Why A Horizontal Lifeline May Be The Wrong Solution.”  The teaser title was click bait, but if you took the time to read the article, you came away with a simple explanation:  horizontal lifelines aren’t appropriate for low fall clearance applications where the worker can impact the ground before the system arrests the fall.  This month, we’ll compare and contrast two common solutions for rooftop applications–guardrail and horizontal lifelines.

Read More

Why A Horizontal Lifeline May Be The Wrong Solution

Let’s assume you’ve just witnessed an employee come dangerously close to falling from a flat-bed trailer in an area that lacks fall protection.  Most folks with a rudimentary understanding of our industry equate tie-off points with horizontal lifelines, so it makes sense that you might contact a fall protection company about an HLL system.  In this case, making the decision to speak with a fall protection expert would be the right call, but you’d be missing the mark by inquiring about a lifeline system for a trailer application. Here’s why…….

Read More

Is Your Horizontal Lifeline Safe?

Does your horizontal lifeline need recertification?  Are you confused about the recertification process or wondering if a fall protection company can even recertify your HLL? Wondering if your lifeline system is safe?  Despite the simple appearance, lifelines are complex fall protection systems that need periodic inspection and annual recertification.   This post demystifies the recert process and offers answers to frequently asked Lifeline recertification questions.

Read More

Roof Penetrations and Rigid Post Horizontal Lifelines

We’ve covered the advantages of tip over post technology in countless prior posts.  Assuming we aren’t dealing with a steep pitch application or thin gauge roofing material, a horizontal lifeline with tip over post technology will reduce shop fabrication and installation time, reducing costs.  More importantly, tip over post lifeline designs minimize roof penetrations which can cause leaks.  There are scenarios where an architect or engineer won’t deviate from a rigid post design—or instances where the pitch of the roof or gauge of the roof deck rules means a rigid post design is the only option.  That said, these installations require making large openings in the roof.  In case you are wondering just how large of an opening we are talking about, the pictures below tell the story.

Read More

Zorbit Energy Absorber Recall Notice

We recently received word from 3M Fall Protection (formerly Capital Safety) about a production issue with its Zorbit Energy Absorbers that creates a risk of serious injury or death for a user in the event of a fall.

Read More

Calculating Fall Distance Clearance Requirements

During a site visit, we often busy ourselves gathering information to determine if a building’s roof structure, as well as the interior beams, columns, and trusses can withstand the forces generated during fall arrest.  We also collect information on fall clearance distances because fall arrest system is only as good as its ability to ensure you don’t hit the ground—or objects below the work area.

Most clients grasp structure fairly quickly, but fall clearance distance is tricky because its calculation depends on a number of variables including the type of anchor point, the PPE used to form the connection between the anchor point and the worker, and the anchor point’s location. 

Read More

Did You Know?

Using chain to guard any loading docks does not meet the OSHA regulation of a rail to be able to withstand a force of 200 pounds in any direction?