Tech Talk Blog

Horizontal Lifelines For Steep Pitch Applications

When most people hear the phrase “fall protection” their minds immediately gravitate toward construction, loading and unloading railcars and trucks, or inspecting and maintaining crane rails, industrial machinery, and rooftop HVAC equipment.  Each of these scenarios requires work at height, and as such, fall protection is needed.  That said, there are countless additional applications for fall protection systems, and our recent horizontal lifeline installation on the Oculus Transportation Hub in the World Trade Center District is a case in point. 

Read More

Cable Lifeline Fall Protection Systems

Most folks think lifelines when it comes to fall protection, but if you quiz them about how these systems work or when they are good fits for an application, they come up short.  So what is a cable-based fall protection system, and what are the pros and cons of lifeline systems?

Read More

Rooftop Horizontal Lifelines: Tip-Over Post Design Protects Workers and Roofs

RoofSafe AnchorInstalling a rooftop horizontal lifeline often eases worries about OSHA compliance, but without exercising proper care, permanently attaching a fall protection system creates the potential for leaks and roof damage.  Although the horizontal lifelines offered by various manufacturers look similar, there are significant differences, most notably in anchor post design.  Your choice of manufacturer has a direct bearing on the size and number of penetrations required during rooftop lifeline installation.  Proper anchor post design can also limit roof damage in the event of a fall. When it comes to lifeline applications for flat and low slope roofs, we recommend Capital Safety’s RoofSafe™ tip-over posts and here’s why….

Read More

Tip Over Versus Rigid Post Connections for Horizontal Lifeline Applications

Our latest video explains the two types of engineered connections used for horizontal lifeline applications:  tip over posts and rigid post anchors.  If you have ever wondered about the differences between these anchoring methods, how the posts are installed, or the pros and cons of each methodology, this video is for you.  To learn more, click the video link below.

Read More

Did You Know?

All guardrail that is protecting an opening or leading edge must be able to support 200 pounds on the top rail and 150 pounds on the midrail in any direction?