Tech Talk Blog

Roof Penetrations and Rigid Post Horizontal Lifelines

We’ve covered the advantages of tip over post technology in countless prior posts.  Assuming we aren’t dealing with a steep pitch application or thin gauge roofing material, a horizontal lifeline with tip over post technology will reduce shop fabrication and installation time, reducing costs.  More importantly, tip over post lifeline designs minimize roof penetrations which can cause leaks.  There are scenarios where an architect or engineer won’t deviate from a rigid post design—or instances where the pitch of the roof or gauge of the roof deck rules means a rigid post design is the only option.  That said, these installations require making large openings in the roof.  In case you are wondering just how large of an opening we are talking about, the pictures below tell the story.

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Fall Protection Myths That Create A Dangerous Work Environment

Our fall protection experts spend much time educating clients on how to create and maintain a safe, OSHA compliant work environment.  During our conversations with folks, we do a lot of listening before making recommendations, and we think of ourselves as educators rather than sales people.  Most of the time, our clients are thrilled with this approach, but from time to time, we run into the rare individual who thinks employees can work safely at heights without fall protection.  We know what you are thinking—with all of the emphasis on workplace safety and OSHA compliance, a company should never ask folks to work at heights without protection.  That said, there are plenty of myths and misconceptions used to justify the absence of adequate fall protection.  What follows is a random sampling of thoughts debunking potentially dangerous statements about fall protection. 

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Rooftop Guardrail Versus Horizontal Lifelines—Selecting the Proper Fall Protection System

When it comes to rooftop fall protection, a wide range of options ranging from guardrail to horizontal lifelines can ensure worker safety and OSHA compliance. Choosing from multiple strategies means we can tailor a system to meet your specific needs and budget, but this range of choice can cause client confusion too.  This post discusses two of the more common approaches to rooftop fall protection–guardrail and horizontal lifeline systems.

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Rooftop Fall Protection Options

The rooftop maintenance season is now in full swing.  In the eyes of OSHA, your building’s roof is a raised work platform of four feet or more, and as such, all of the unprotected leading edges pose fall hazards.  That said, every rooftop is unique.  The “ideal” rooftop fall protection system installed next door may not suit your specific needs due to differing maintenance requirements.  This post offers a brief introduction to common rooftop fall protection solutions and their many uses.

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Introduction to Commercial Roofing Materials and Installing Fall Protection Systems While Minimizing Leaks

When it comes to exploring rooftop fall protection options, the first item of consideration is the roof itself.  Your fall protection company will want to know if you have a steep or flat roof and the nature of the roofing materials.  If you don’t know the answers to these questions, the engineer charged with performing the site assessment can make these determinations using a supplied picture or when they arrive to assess the fall hazard; however, the ability to describe your roof in an email or phone call always gives your safety engineer a head start.  Let’s take a closer look at the styles of commercial roofs and the challenges they pose during the installation of fall protection systems.

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Winter Weather and Rooftop Fall Protection

With the onset of winter, one might think that there is less of a need to think about fall protection.  In much of the country, the arrival of snow and ice means there is less activity on rooftops.  With proper planning, facilities managers can knock out the vast majority of their regularly scheduled rooftop maintenance during the warmer months.  Although the change of seasons should lessen the demand for new fall protection system installations, every winter we hear from clients with unanticipated emergencies that require safe rooftop access.  We also receive inquiries from clients with buildings in areas of the country known for large accumulations of snow and ice. When you combine routine nasty winters, aggressive wind patterns and a quirky roofline, you end up with a recipe for slips, trips, and falls.

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Did You Know?

When stopping a fall, personal fall arrest systems must limit the maximum arresting force on the body to 1,800 pounds?