Roof Fall Protection

Roofing / Rooftop Fall Protection

Falls are one of the most significant causes of occupational injuries and fatalities in both general industry and the construction sector. Sadly, many of these injuries and deaths can be avoided with proper fall arrest systems in place.  Although many view roof fall protection systems as a nuisance that decreases worker productivity, there is no need to compromise safety in the name of efficiency.    By partnering with a fall protection company familiar with the unique nature of fall hazards associated with roof maintenance, inspection, and repair, cost effective solutions that ensure worker safety and OSHA compliance are achievable without compromising productivity.

Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection
Roof Fall Protection

We are a complete turnkey provider of roof fall protection systems, including horizontal lifelines and guardrail systems, and we have years of design and installation experience in this market sector.  Contact us for expert assistance with your roof fall arrest, fall restraint and fall protection safety requirements.

Design Considerations

Roof Fall Protection Design Considerations During roofing or rooftop maintenance and repair, OSHA regulations clearly state some form of fall protection must be available.  The system design may take many shapes and forms, including guardrails, single point anchors, a horizontal lifeline, or even a simple warning line.  With this said, there are no circumstances where rooftop work may be performed in the absence of a fall protection system. Best practices for roofing applications include:
  • The fall protection system must arrest a fall before a worker comes into contact with structure below.
  • Skylights and other openings must be protected by guardrail or covers.
  • Portable horizontal lifelines must be securely fastened to trusses, beams, or roof seams to absorb the forces associated with a fall.
  • Warning lines should be used only as a last resort when no other options are available.
  • Use of vertical lifelines for temporary ladders over 20’.
  • Use of roofing industry specific PPE.
AT DFP, we appreciate the unique nature of the roofing industry’s access points, fall hazards, and the need for fall arrest solutions that are tailored to your specific application. . Furthermore, it is extremely helpful to understand the types of materials and conditions associated with the site in en effort to provide you a recommendation that is specifically tailored to your needs. Our years of experience designing and installing fall protection systems for the roofing industry and our proven track record of training personnel in the safe use of these systems  will keep your employees safe and your construction site in compliance with all OSHA fall protection regulations.  To learn more about roof fall arrest systems, or to discuss your application, contact the fall protection specialists at DFP for more information.

OSHA Regulations

  • Single Point Anchors
    • 1926.502(d) 'Personal fall arrest systems.' Personal fall arrest systems and their use shall comply with the provisions set forth below. Effective January 1, 1998, body belts are not acceptable as part of a personal fall arrest system. Note: The use of a body belt in a positioning device system is acceptable and is regulated under paragraph (e) of this section.
    • 1926.502(d)(15) Anchorages used for attachment of personal fall arrest equipment shall be independent of any anchorage being used to support or suspend platforms and capable of supporting at least 5,000 pounds (22.2 kN) per employee attached, or shall be designed, installed, and used as follows:
    • 1926.502(d)(15)(i) as part of a complete personal fall arrest system which maintains a safety factor of at least two; and
    • 1926.502(d)(15)(ii) under the supervision of a qualified person.

Did You Know?

There were 6,271 cited Fall Protection OSHA standards violations in 2015?