Tech Talk Blog

Engineered Differences in DFP’s Gen2 Rooftop Warning Line System

Recently in a post, we covered OSHA requirements for warning line compliance. Understanding where (and when) you can use a warning line instead of a more substantial protection method to prevent falls, as well as the required physical attributes represent the keys to OSHA compliance.

Gen2 Warning Line System set up on a roof

Gen2 Warning Line System set up on a roof

In today’s post featuring Diversified Fall Protection’s Gen2 Roof Warning Line System, we explain the attributes that make it a best-in-class solution.

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Is a Roof Warning Line OSHA Compliant?

One common question people ask about work on low slope roofs concerns warning line use. Specifically, clients ask: “Are rooftop warning lines OSHA compliant?”

Close-up of warning line marker

Close-up of warning line marker

The short answer to this seemingly simple question is “it depends.”

Here are the factors you need to assess…

For work scenarios less than six feet from the roof edge, per OSHA 1910.28(b)(13)(i), employers must protect workers from falling with a guardrail system, safety net system, travel restraint system, or personal fall arrest system.

Put another way, warning lines are not an OSHA compliant form of fall protection under these circumstances.

Per OSHA 1910.28(b)(13)(ii), when work is performed at least six feet but less than fifteen feet from the leading edge, employers may protect employees from fall hazards with a passive restraint guardrail system, safety net, travel restraints system, or a personal fall arrest system.

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Did You Know?

According to OSHA, the distance from a leading edge does not mitigate the hazard? Any leading edge over 4 feet in general industry and 6 feet in construction is considered a hazard.