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Engineered Differences in DFP’s Gen2 Rooftop Warning Line System

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Recently in a post, we covered OSHA requirements for warning line compliance. Understanding where (and when) you can use a warning line instead of a more substantial protection method to prevent falls, as well as the required physical attributes represent the keys to OSHA compliance.

Gen2 Warning Line System set up on a roof

Gen2 Warning Line System set up on a roof

In today’s post featuring Diversified Fall Protection’s Gen2 Roof Warning Line System, we explain the attributes that make it a best-in-class solution.

When DFP engineers set out to design our Gen2 warning line system, they wanted to go beyond simply ensuring OSHA compliance. The engineers approached these structural design choices in several different ways.

For starters, we had noticed many of the warning line flags seen in the field do not hold up against the elements. Primarily in use on rooftops, constant wind and UV exposure can damage the flags which are typically made of thin, vinyl material. The Gen2 flags are made from a high visibility, rigid UV resistant plastic for long service life.

High visibility, rigid UV-resistant plastic warning line flag

High visibility, rigid UV-resistant plastic warning line flag

The second area to improve based on constant exposure to the elements were the supporting vertical upright posts.

Unlike some warning lines erected in the field with powder coated vertical uprights, each of our posts receives a triple layer of protection on the interior and exterior to protect against weather. Zinc, conversion coating, and a clear polymer topcoat are all applied in-line to our substantial steel stanchion posts ensuring a uniform coating of corrosion protection, inside and out.

Our engineers also developed a top cap that features a set screw design to “lock in” the warning line itself preventing any line sag, an important consideration per OSHA 1910.29(d)(2)(iii).

Gen2 System prevents line sagging via design that “locks in” the warning line

Gen2 System prevents line sagging via design that “locks in” the warning line

The regulation requires that warning lines must be “supported in such a manner that pulling on one section of the line will not result in slack being taken up in adjacent sections causing the line to fall below the limits specified in paragraph (d)(2)(ii) of this section.

This same OSHA requirement inspired the outrigger design we developed for 90-degree bends and termination points. By utilizing an outrigger and a second 62-pound concrete weighted base, force applied at corners or the end of the warning line will prevent the system from tipping over. Non-penetrating weighted bases on the Gen2 warning line system stand up to high winds.

90-degree turns, and termination points anchored by outrigger weighted base design

90-degree turns, and termination points anchored by outrigger weighted base design

OSHA 1926.502(f)(2)(iii) calls for warning lines to “be capable of resisting, without tipping over, a force of at least 16 pounds applied horizontally against the stanchion, 30 inches above the walking/working surface, perpendicular to the warning line, and in the direction of the floor, roof, or platform edge.

DFP’s Gen2 is ideal for temporary or permanent warning line applications. To learn more about the Gen2 Roof Warning Line System, contact the safety specialists at Diversified Fall Protection for further assistance.

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Did You Know?

It is the responsibility of the employer to provide proper fall protection to all workers who are exposed to fall hazards?