Tech Talk Blog

Skylight Guardrail Fall Protection

Skylight Without Fall ProtectionDuring rooftop safety assessments, we often ask our clients to point out known fall hazards.  The most frequently mentioned rooftop fall hazard is the building’s leading edge.  From here, some clients mention roof elevation changes or access hatches, but most struggle to identify additional fall hazards that may trigger OSHA violations.  Sometimes the most innocuous feature—for example, a skylight—is the most troublesome omission because folks fail to see the potential dangers posed by areas that appear safe. 

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New OSHA Regulations for Window Washing Anchors and Rope Descent Systems

By now, you’ve probably heard about OSHA’s revised Walking-Working Surfaces regulations.  Many of the articles published on this topic explore the deadlines to convert from ladder cages to ladder safety systems (we recently published an e-book that discusses the new ladder regulations).  Make no mistake—the revised fixed ladder requirements are significant, but the new OSHA regulations cover additional ground that will impact employers and property owners nationwide.    In this post, we’ll look at the new Walking-Working Surfaces regulations as they relate to the use rope descent systems (RDS) and window washing anchors. 

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Download Your Fall Protection Guide

fall-protection-guideFall protection education has been a core company value here since our founding in 1994.  Most of our clients appreciate the need for fall protection, but they don’t always understand the different approaches to fall protection or why we recommend one system style over another.

For example, many folks automatically equate fall arrest with cable-style horizontal lifelines, but limited fall clearance applications are better suited for rigid beam rail systems because they minimize deflection.   It’s one thing to hear a fall safety specialist make these types of statements, but quite another to visualize the differences between the two approaches.

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Did You Know?

When stopping a fall, personal fall arrest systems must limit the maximum arresting force on the body to 1,800 pounds?