Tech Talk Blog

Does OSHA Require Anchorages for All Suspended Window Washing Applications?

Much confusion exists over the OSHA regulations pertaining to Rope Descent Systems (RDS) and Industrial Rope Access Systems (IRAS) used for high rise façade maintenance and window washing applications.  OSHA’s recently updated 1910 Subpart D standard includes specific language to ensure window washing safety when rope descent systems are used and requires the building owner to provide written assurances to the window washing contractor as outlined in 1910.27(b).

These assurances document the capacity of the anchorage system used to support window washing operations and safeguard employees working at height.  But because the new OSHA regulations speak specifically to the certified anchorage requirement for rope descent systems while making clear these provisions do not apply to industrial rope access or suspended scaffolds, what are the responsibilities of building owners when a window washing application requires an alternative means of suspended access?

Read More

Are Your Access Ladders OSHA Compliant?

Access ladders are one of the hardest hit areas by OSHA’s released revised Walking Working Surfaces regulations.  Although the most commonly mentioned change is the phase out of ladder cages as an acceptable form of fall protection on ladders extending 24 feet or more above a lower level, here are some equally important regulatory changes that may spell non-compliance for ladders in your facility.

Read More

Are Window Washing Contractors Responsible for Anchorage of their Equipment and Safety Lines?

Window washing anchorPrior to recent updates to the Walking Working Surfaces regulations, OSHA had little to say regarding  rope descent system (RDS) commonly utilized by window washing contractors.  The absence of specific regulations pertaining to RDS often put building owners and contractors at odds over which party was responsible for window washing anchor inspection and certification.    In some instances, building owners would include contractual provisions requiring window washing contractors to supply their own means of anchorage and fall protection.  The absence of clearly worded regulations created unsafe working conditions since delineation of responsibilities between the building owner and window washing contractor was not well defined.

Read More

Are Caged Ladders Still OSHA Compliant?

ladder cage with vertical lifeline systemRecent changes to OSHA’s Walking Working Surfaces regulations have prompted scores of questions such as “are caged ladders still OSHA compliant” and “when is a ladder lifeline required on a fixed ladder?” In this post, we’ll tackle a recent client question on fixed ladders in an effort clear up some of the confusion surrounding the new OSHA regulations.

Read More

Engineered Horizontal Lifeline vs. Temporary HLL

temporary hll

We live and work in an internet age where almost everything can be found online with the click of a mouse.  We can search the internet for answers to the most vexing problems, and more importantly, we can buy just about anything, including fall protection systems.  Although it may be tempting to buy a horizontal lifeline kit online, there are compelling reasons to think twice before placing a temporary HLL into your shopping cart.

At first glance, a temporary lifeline is a tempting offer.  It is aggressively priced and once ordered, the kit arrives at your facility in just a few days.  It is a DIY solution, meaning your maintenance staff can perform the installation, saving time and money. Where it is a cost-effective solution, is it the right solution for you and your company?

Read More

Did You Know?

Diversified Fall Protection offers Horizontal Lifeline Kits for rooftop applications?