Crane and Crane Rail

Crane and Crane Rail Fall Protection

The overhead cranes, bridges, trolleys, rails and runway systems in your facility are vital to ensure safe and efficient operations, but their maintenance presents safety challenges.  From the steel and foundry industries to automotive assembly plants and fabrication shops, Diversified Fall Protection understands the fall hazards associated with crane and crane rail maintenance and repair.

With the aid of a Horizontal Lifeline, workers can safely perform maintenance on a crane.
With the aid of a Horizontal Lifeline, workers can safely perform maintenance on a crane.
With the aid of a Horizontal Lifeline, workers can safely perform maintenance on a crane.
With the aid of a Horizontal Lifeline, workers can safely perform maintenance on a crane.
With the aid of a Horizontal Lifeline, workers can safely perform maintenance on a crane.
With the aid of a Horizontal Lifeline, workers can safely perform maintenance on a crane.
With the aid of a Horizontal Lifeline, workers can safely perform maintenance on a crane.
With the aid of a Horizontal Lifeline, workers can safely perform maintenance on a crane.

When it comes to material handling applications, crane up-time is critical and providing safe access to maintenance personnel while working at heights is a must.  Ensuring working safety and OSHA compliance requires the implementation of a comprehensive fall prevention strategy, which includes the proper mix of fall protection equipment, personnel training, and partnering with a fall protection company that appreciates the unique nature of your crane’s access points and potential fall hazards.  With a properly designed fall protection system, your maintenance personnel will have the mobility they need to get the job done without compromising safety.

Whether you need inspection and repair of an existing crane rail lifeline, or installation of a new fall arrest system for an unprotected area, we can help.  To schedule an on-site hazard assessment or discuss your fall protection needs, contact the safety specialists at Diversified Fall Protection.

We are a complete turnkey provider of  engineered fall protection systems and have years of design and installation experience in the crane and crane rail market sector.  Contact us for expert assistance with your fall arrest, fall restraint and fall protection  requirements.

Design Considerations

Crane and Crane Rail Fall Protection Design Considerations
Horizontal lifeline systems used to provide safe access for crane rail inspection must be secured on columns or support structure above the path of the crane.  Placement of a horizontal lifeline must not impede the crane’s path and caution must be exercised on the “hot” side of the crane rail to prevent accidental electrocution in the event of a fall.  Horizontal lifelines are also used to provide safe access to the bridge or girder section of the crane during end truck, gear, and power drive maintenance, and fall protection system design must not interfere with drum maintenance.

Ensuring crane and crane rail safety and OSHA compliance requires a turnkey approach.  Our team of fall protection engineers can also fabricate and install runway access stairs and ladders to reduce the risks associated with climbing up to a monorail or overhead crane.

OSHA Regulations

  • Horizontal Lifelines
    • 1926.502(d)(8)
      Horizontal lifelines shall be designed, installed, and used, under the supervision of a qualified person, as part of a complete personal fall arrest system, which maintains a safety factor of at least two.
  • Personal Fall Arrest Systems
    • 1926.502(d)(16)
      Personal fall arrest systems, when stopping a fall, shall:
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(ii)
      limit maximum arresting force on an employee to 1,800 pounds (8 kN) when used with a body harness;
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(iii)
      be rigged such that an employee can neither free fall more than 6 feet (1.8 m), nor contact any lower level;
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(iv)
      bring an employee to a complete stop and limit maximum deceleration distance an employee travels to 3.5 feet (1.07 m); and,
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(v)
      have sufficient strength to withstand twice the potential impact energy of an employee free falling a distance of 6 feet (1.8 m), or the free fall distance permitted by the system, whichever is less.

Did You Know?

It is the responsibility of the employer to provide and install the proper fall protection systems needed to protect and keep their workers safe?