Rescue and Descent Systems

Rescue and Descent Systems

From controlled descent devices and tension limiters to rescue winches and ladders, Diversified Fall Protection offers a complete line of OSHA approved products that keep your workers safe and save lives when accidents occur.  Over the years, our vendor partners have developed a number of new and innovative  fall protection and confined space rescue and descent products with features that are industry standards today. All of our rescue and descent systems are developed in close collaboration with end-users to meet application specific needs, leading to improved comfort, increased productivity, and the required OSHA compliance to keep workers safe at heights.

Rescue and Descent Systems
Rescue and Descent Systems
Rescue and Descent Systems
Rescue and Descent Systems
Rescue and Descent Systems
Rescue and Descent Systems
Rescue and Descent Systems
Rescue and Descent Systems

We are a complete turnkey provider of OSHA compliant rescue and descent equipment and have years of practical field experience in this area. Contact us for expert assistance with your fall arrest, fall restraint and fall protection safety requirements.

OSHA Regulations

  • Personal Fall Arrest Systems
    • 1926.502(d)(16) Personal fall arrest systems, when stopping a fall, shall:
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(ii) limit maximum arresting force on an employee to 1,800 pounds (8 kN) when used with a body harness;
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(iii) be rigged such that an employee can neither free fall more than 6 feet (1.8 m), nor contact any lower level;
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(iv) bring an employee to a complete stop and limit maximum deceleration distance an employee travels to 3.5 feet (1.07 m); and,
    • 1926.502(d)(16)(v) have sufficient strength to withstand twice the potential impact energy of an employee free falling a distance of 6 feet (1.8 m), or the free fall distance permitted by the system, whichever is less.

Did You Know?

According to OSHA, the distance from a leading edge does not mitigate the hazard? Any leading edge over 4 feet in general industry and 6 feet in construction is considered a hazard.