TRAM

Rigid Rail Fall Protection Systems For Tanker Trucks

Ideal for tanker applications, including fuel, bulk powder, and water, TRAM (Travel Restraint Access Module) is a rigid rail fall restraint system  that offers full mobility.  Unlike fall arrest systems,  TRAM offers fall protection during access and egress and restrains workers from going over an unprotected leading while working on top of tankers, eliminating suspension trauma and the likelihood of coming into contact with structure below the designated work area.

With the aid of a TRAM System, a worker using is able to safely perform maintenance on a tanker.
With the aid of a TRAM System, a worker using is able to safely perform maintenance on a tanker.
With the aid of a TRAM System, a worker using is able to safely perform maintenance on a tanker.
With the aid of a TRAM System, a worker using is able to safely perform maintenance on a tanker.
With the aid of a TRAM System, a worker using is able to safely perform maintenance on a tanker.
With the aid of a TRAM System, a worker using is able to safely perform maintenance on a tanker.
With the aid of a TRAM System, a worker using is able to safely perform maintenance on a tanker.
With the aid of a TRAM System, a worker using is able to safely perform maintenance on a tanker.

Remember, falls are the leading cause of occupational injuries and fatalities each year, and the increased insurance and workman’s compensation premiums combined with the legal fees associated with a fall can have dire consequences.  Ensure OSHA compliance and worker safety during tanker loading and unloading with a TRAM fall protection system from the safety experts at Diversified.

We are a complete turnkey provider of OSHA compliant low profile, rigid rail fall protection systems and have years of design and installation experience.  Contact us for expert assistance with your fall arrest, fall restraint and fall protection requirements

Design Considerations

TRAM Design Considerations The TRAM system makes use of an arm that raises and lowers with the assistance of a gas piston. This design feature provides fall restraint both during platform access and egress, as well while changing between standing and squatting positions while working. The arm serves as a moving handhold, providing user stability while working on the platform and can be set in three positions:   vertical, horizontal and 45 degrees. Clutch and brake levers ensure that the arm and base remain locked in place until the user is ready to move to a new location.   The arm travels along a corrosion resistant square rail which is permanently attached to the top of the tanker using welded or riveted mounting blocks.  The rail can be cut to custom lengths to accomodate the length of any tanker.

OSHA Regulations

  • Personal Fall Arrest Systems:  System performance criteria. In addition to the general requirements in paragraph (c) of this section, the employer must ensure that personal fall arrest systems: 1910.140(d)(1)(i)
    • Limit the maximum arresting force on the employee to 1,800 pounds (8 kN); 1910.140(d)(1)(ii)
    • Bring the employee to a complete stop and limit the maximum deceleration distance the employee travels to 3.5 feet (1.1 m); 1910.140(d)(1)(iii)
    • Have sufficient strength to withstand twice the potential impact energy of the employee free falling a distance of 6 feet (1.8 m), or the free fall distance permitted by the system; and... 1910.140(d)(1)(iv)
    • Sustain the employee within the system/strap configuration without making contact with the employee's neck and chin area. 1910.140(d)(1)(v)
      If the personal fall arrest system meets the criteria and protocols in appendix D of this subpart, and is being used by an employee having a combined body and tool weight of less than 310 pounds (140 kg), the system is considered to be in compliance with the provisions of paragraphs (d)(1)(i) through (iii) of this section. If the system is used by an employee having a combined body and tool weight of 310 pounds (140kg) or more and the employer has appropriately modified the criteria and protocols in appendix D, then the system will be deemed to be in compliance with the requirements of paragraphs (d)(1)(i) through (iii). 1910.140(d)(2)   The employer must ensure that:
    • On any horizontal lifeline that may become a vertical lifeline, the device used to connect to the horizontal lifeline is capable of locking in both directions on the lifeline. 1910.140(d)(2)(ii)
    • Personal fall arrest systems are rigged in such a manner that the employee cannot free fall more than 6 feet (1.8 m) or contact a lower level. A free fall may be more than 6 feet (1.8 m) provided the employer can demonstrate the manufacturer designed the system to allow a free fall of more than 6 feet and tested the system to ensure a maximum arresting force of 1,800 pounds (8 kN) is not exceeded. 1910.140(d)(3)
    • Body belts. Body belts are prohibited as part of a personal fall arrest system.

Did You Know?

Using chain to guard any loading docks does not meet the OSHA regulation of a rail to be able to withstand a force of 200 pounds in any direction?